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Giving

Please consider making a donation to the Department of Anthropology so that we may continue to attract some of the best faculty and students to MU and provide excellent learning opportunities for students and the community. We have a number of established gift funds from which you may choose if you want to support the department directly. Your assistance, no matter its magnitude, is greatly appreciated by everyone affiliated with the anthropology department.

Anthropology Development Gift Fund

Anthropology Development Gift Fund

Gifts from alumni and friends are significant in the day-to-day operations of the department as well as the long-term success of the program. By supporting the Anthropology Gift Fund you can invest in the current and future success of the department.  Donations provide unrestricted support for both faculty and students including research and educational opportunities inside and outside the classroom such as conference travel, field site research, guest speakers, and community outreach activities where kids get hands-on experience in anthropology.  These gifts also give the chair flexibility when exciting research and advancement opportunities arise during the year.

Please consider making a donation to the Department of Anthropology so we may continue to attract the best faculty and students to MU, and provide excellent learning opportunities for students and the community.

Jesse E. Wrench Memorial Scholarship

Jesse E. Wrench Memorial Scholarship

The Jesse E. Wrench Memorial Scholarship, named in honor of Professor Wrench, who is often described as the “Father of Missouri Archaeology”, was established in 1959. This scholarship is awarded to outstanding undergraduate students majoring in anthropology who demonstrate academic excellence. The Department of Anthropology’s goal is to increase the endowment fund thereby preserving Dr. Jesse Wrench’s memory through more student awards, and at the same time acknowledging the department’s many outstanding students. Your donation now is an investment in anthropology’s future.

Anthropology Student Scholarship

Anthropology Student Scholarship

Established by alumni and friends of the Department of Anthropology including funds given in memory of Dr. Carl H. and Eleanor Chapman. The scholarship is awarded to newly entering M.A. and Ph.D. students in need of support and/or with exceptional potential.  Anthropology’s goal is to increase the endowment with your support.  Your donation will allow the department more opportunities to recruit exceptional new graduate students and create a thriving graduate program in anthropology and the sciences. 

Dorothy (Dot) Tompkins Gelvin, and Bruce R. Gelvin PhD Memorial Scholarship

Established by Bruce R. Gelvin PhD 1975, to honor the memory of his wife, Dot. Dot received both her undergraduate and doctoral degrees from MU, specializing in physical/biological anthropology for the latter. The Gelvin Scholarship is awarded to a graduate student pursuing advanced training in biological/physical anthropology.

H. Clyde Wilson Opportunities for Excellence in Cultural Anthropology

Established by Betty Wilson, friends and family in honor of her husband, H. Clyde Wilson who was emeritus professor, former department chair, and city mayor. The fund provides student support and promotes professional growth for graduate students studying cultural anthropology.

W. Raymond Wood Opportunities for Excellence in Archaeology

Established by students of Ray Wood with gratitude for his help and counsel and in recognition of his importance to archaeology in general. This fund promotes the professional growth of archaeology students in the Department of Anthropology.

James A. and Margaret S. Gavan Lecture in Anthropology Fund

This fund commemorates the intellectual influence of the Gavans on the first generation of an-thropologists trained at MU. The Gavans attracted outstanding anthropologists to this campus for lectures and informal events that always involved students. Their daughter, Margaret Schoeninger (an eminent anthropologist herself), and Bruce and Dot Gelvin, students of Jim Gavan, established a special lecture to honor the Gavans' memory.